FLMS2010: Film Genre Study

letterhead

 

 

 

dracula-bela_00373188FLMS2010: Film Genre Study

Thursdays, 09:15 – 12:15

 Dr. Mikel J. Koven (office BB133)

m.koven@worc.ac.uk

*Please Note: New room allocation for Semester 2 – JL 2003*

 

The module aims to present students with the historical development of popular cinematic genres, as well going in-depth into a single genre. Students will be expected to develop a critical understanding of characteristic conventions of the selected genres with particular reference to the periods on which the module will focus. They will compare and contrast generic conventions and explore genre theory as it has been used within Film Studies. Students will be expected to consider a range of genre texts. Students will develop various approaches to conducting research in Film Studies e.g. textual analysis, semiotic analysis and genre

 

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate an in-depth understanding of genre as well as develop analytical approaches to selected genres;
  2. give evidence of a sense of the historical placement of the genres as they developed and be able to relate their themes to a wider context;
  3. highlight through textual analysis the significance of particular and relatable sequences;
  4. develop arguments in which local detail is related to genre theory; demonstrate critical understanding of differences and similarities in the conventions of selected genres with tutor support.

 

Attendance Policy:

It is expected that you will attend all taught sessions, in the same way that attendance is expected in the workplace. Indeed regular attendance has a significant impact on student engagement, understanding and successful completion of University courses. Furthermore non-attendance will significantly affect your ability successfully to complete a module and may jeopardise your ability to undertake re-assessment in the event of failing a module.

It is your responsibility as a student, just as it would be if you were an employee, to ensure that you are punctual and that your attendance has been recorded on the register each week.

Should you, for some unavoidable reason, be unable to attend a scheduled session (for example if you are ill) then you must send an email to ihcastudentabsence@worc.ac.uk . Please include in your email your name and student number, the module code and name, the date of the missed session, and your reason for missing it. You should make sure that you copy the module tutor into the email and also contact your module tutor to make arrangements to catch up on any work you have missed.

Notification must be received within 6 days of the date of the missed session.

Alternatively you can inform IHCA of your absence via the telephone. Please ring 01905 542015 (Shirley Adams) with the required details.

Students with two or more unexplained absences may be required to attend a tutorial/ interview with the module leader, course leader or head of division to discuss their progress.

 

Learning Contract:

On this module you are expected to be courteous and attentive to your fellow classmates and to the module tutor. You are also expected to undertake the required reading each week and to view the film or films under question. Failure to do either of these things will severely impede your success on the module.

The use of mobile phones will not be tolerated in classes, lectures or screenings. Please turn off all phones before the lesson starts.

Please feel free to email me (m.koven@worc.ac.uk) with any queries you have regarding the module, I will try to reply within 3 working days. My office hours will be posted on the door of my office (BB 133), however I am always open to seeing students at other times if you make an appointment.   

Required & Recommended Readings

Reading lists can be found via the Talis Resource List for this module.  (Visitors to this site will be able to look at the reading lists, but only University of Worcester students will be able to access the materials themselves)

Films:

Every effort will be made to make the films available for you to watch. However, it is your responsibility to ensure that you have seen the texts being discussed. You can source many of the films on Netflix, Amazon Instant or You Tube, however there may be some DVD purchase necessary. In that instance, you will be informed well ahead of time.

 

Key Films:

Semester 1:

The Adventures of Robin Hood (Michael Curtiz & William Keighley, 1938)

The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, 1948)

Cat People (Jacques Tourneur, 1942)

Gold Diggers of 1933 (Mervyn LeRoy, 1933)

Guadalcanal Diary (Lewis Seiler, 1943)

Out of the Past (Jacques Tourneur, 1947)

Mildred Pierce (Michael Curtiz, 1945)

My Darling Clementine (John Ford, 1946)

Rebel Without a Cause (Nicholas Ray, 1955)

To Be or Not To Be (Ernst Lubitsch, 1943)

 

Semester 2:

An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)

Blood on Satan’s Claw (Piers Haggard, 1971)

Carrie (Brian de Palma, 1976)

Castle of Blood (Sergio Corbucci & Antonio Margheriti, 1964)

Deep Red (Profundo Rosso, Dario Argento, 1975)

Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978)

Martyrs (Pascal Laugier, 2008)

Rabies (Kalevet, Aharon Keshales & Navot Papushado, 2010)

Shutter (Bangjong Pisanthanakun & Parakpoom Wongpom, 2004)

Taxidermia (György Pálfi, 2006)

Videodrome (David Cronenberg, 1982)

Zombie Flesh Eaters (Zombi 2, Lucio Fulci, 1979)

 


Module Outline (topics and films subject to change)

29 Sept: Module Overview

06 Oct: Action Adventure Film
Film: The Adventures of Robin Hood (Michael Curtiz & William Keighley, 1938)

13 Oct: Musicals
Film: Gold Diggers of 1933 (Mervyn LeRoy, 1933)

20 Oct: Westerns
Film: My Darling Clementine (John Ford, 1946)

27 Oct: Horror
Film: Cat People (Jacques Tourneur, 1942)

03 Nov: Reading Week

10 Nov: War Movies
Film: Guadalcanal Diary (Lewis Seiler, 1943)

 

17 Nov: Comedy
Film: To Be or Not To Be (Ernst Lubitsch, 1943)

 

24 Nov: Melodrama
Film: Mildred Pierce (Michael Curtiz, 1945)

 

01 Dec: Teen-Pics
Film: Rebel Without a Cause (Nicholas Ray, 1955)

08 Dec: Crime/Gangster Films
Film: The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks, 1948)

 

05 Jan: Film Noir
Film: Out of the Past (Jacques Tourneur, 1947)

12 Jan: Genre Pragmatics
Film: N/A

16 – 20 Jan: Assignment Week

23-27 Jan: Worcester Week

 


Semester 2

02 Feb: The Uncanny & the Fantastic
Film: An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

09 Feb: The Return of the Repressed
Film: Rabies (Kalevet, Aharon Keshales & Navot Papushado, 2010)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

16 Feb: The Monstrous-Feminine
Film: Carrie (Brian de Palma, 1976)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

23 Feb: The Slasher & the Final Girl
Film: Halloween (John Carpenter, 1978)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

02 March: Body Horror
Film: Videodrome (David Cronenberg, 1982)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

09 March: The Gothic
Film: Castle of Blood (Sergio Corbucci & Antonio Margheriti, 1964)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

16 March: Folk Horror
Film: Blood on Satan’s Claw (Piers Haggard, 1971)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

23 March: The Giallo
Film: Deep Red (Profundo Rosso, Dario Argento, 1975)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

30 March: Asian Extreme
Film: Shutter (Bangjong Pisanthanakun & Parakpoom Wongpom, 2004)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

06 April: Horror as Art-Cinema
Film: Taxidermia (György Pálfi, 2006)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

10 May – 21 May: Easter Break

27 April: New French Extreme Cinema
Film: Martyrs (Pascal Laugier, 2008)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List

04 May: Zombies and the Post-colonial
Film: Zombie Flesh Eaters (Zombi 2, Lucio Fulci, 1979)
Readings, please see Talis Resources List



Assignments

Sequence Analysis

This assignment is designed to assess your abilities at textual analysis within the context of genre studies. In this assignment you are asked to textually analyse the opening five minutes of a genre film from one (1) of the following, action-adventure, musical, western, horror (or science fiction) or combat film and through close textual analysis of that clip, demonstrate how the film establishes its genre.  Effectively, the question you are answering here is “How do we (in the audience) know, from the first five minutes, that this particular film belongs to this particular genre?”  You are free to choose any film from the Classical Hollywood period (~1927-1960), other than one studied on the module.

Your essay will be assessed according to the Learning Outcomes (as noted on page 2 of this handbook):

  1. demonstrate an in-depth understanding of genre as well as develop analytical approaches to selected genres;
  2. give evidence of a sense of the historical placement of the genres as they developed and be able to relate their themes to a wider context;
  3. highlight through textual analysis the significance of particular and relatable sequences;
  4. develop arguments in which local detail is related to genre theory; demonstrate critical understanding of differences and similarities in the conventions of selected genres with tutor support.

Length, 1000 words; Due, 24 November, at 15:00; Weighting, 20%

 

Pragmatics Essay

Discuss Altman’s idea of genre as defined by pragmatics in a representative film of your choice. Your only limit is you are not able to discuss a film you’ve previously written on.

Your essay will be assessed according to the Learning Outcomes (as noted on page 2 of this handbook):

  1. demonstrate an in-depth understanding of genre as well as develop analytical approaches to selected genres;
  2. give evidence of a sense of the historical placement of the genres as they developed and be able to relate their themes to a wider context;
  3. highlight through textual analysis the significance of particular and relatable sequences;
  4. develop arguments in which local detail is related to genre theory; demonstrate critical understanding of differences and similarities in the conventions of selected genres with tutor support.

 

Length, 1500 words; Due, 23 January, at 15:00; Weighting, 30%

 

Theoretical Essay

Using any one of the theoretical approaches we’ve discussed in reference to the horror film, apply it to a horror film of your choice (but not one studied on this module).

Your essay will be assessed according to the Learning Outcomes (as noted on page 2 of this handbook):

  1. demonstrate an in-depth understanding of genre as well as develop analytical approaches to selected genres;
  2. give evidence of a sense of the historical placement of the genres as they developed and be able to relate their themes to a wider context;
  3. highlight through textual analysis the significance of particular and relatable sequences;
  4. develop arguments in which local detail is related to genre theory; demonstrate critical understanding of differences and similarities in the conventions of selected genres with tutor support.

Length, 1500 words; Due, 18 May, at 15:00; Weighting, 50%

*Assignments will be graded within three weeks of submission*

 

Submission

All assignments should be electronically submitted via the student’s SOLE page. All assignments will be submitted to Turnitin by the module leader.

For information regarding plagiarism, referencing, and general study skills please visit http,//www.worc.ac.uk/studyskills

 

Selected Bibliographies

 

Semester 1

General Genre Theory

Grant, B. K. (2007). Film Genre: From Iconography to Ideology. London: Wallflower Press.

Langford, B. (2005). Film Genre:  Hollywood and Beyond. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Moine, R. (2008). Cinema Genre. A. Fox & H. Radner trans. Oxford: Blackwell.

Schatz, T. (1981). Hollywood Genres: Formulas, Filmmaking, and the Studio System. New York: Random House.

 

Action-Adventure Cinema

Beltrán, M. C. (2005). The New Hollywood Racelessness: Only the Fast, Furious, (And Multiracial) Will Survive. Cinema Journal 44.2: 50-67.

Brown, J. A. (1996). Gender and the Action Heroine: Hardbodies and the “Point of No Return”. Cinema Journal 35.3: 52-71.

French, S. (1996). The Terminator. London: BFI.

Grady, F. (2003). Arnoldian Humanism, or Amnesia and Autobiography in the Schwrzenegger Action Film. Cinema Journal 42.2: 41-56.

Higgins, S. (2008). Suspenseful Situations: Melodramatic Narrative and the Contemporary Action Film. Cinema Journal 47.2: 74-96.

Jung, B. (2010). Narrating Violence in Post-9/11 Action Cinema: Terrorist Narratives, Cinematic Narration, and Referentiality. Berlin: Springer.

King, G. (2000). Spectacular Narratives: Hollywood in the Age of the Blockbuster. London: I. B. Tauris.

O’Brien, H. (2012). Action Cinema: The Cinema of Striking Back. London: Wallflower.

Pope, R. (2012). Doing Justice: A Ritual-Psychoanalytic Approach to Postmodern Melodrama and a Certain Tendency of the Action Film. Cinema Journal 51.2:113-136.

Tasker, Y. (1993). Spectacular Bodies: Gender, Genre and the Action Cinema. London: Routledge.

Tasker, Y. (ed.) (2004). Action and Adventure Cinema. London: Routledge.

 

Musicals

Cohan, S. (ed.) (2002). Hollywood Musicals: The Film Reader. London: Routledge.

Creekmur, C.K. and L. Y. Mokdad (eds.). (2012). The International Film Musical. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Feuer, J. (1978). The Theme of Popular vs. Elite Art in the Hollywood Musical. Journal of Popular Culture. 12.3: 491-499.

Fischer, L. (1976). The Image of Woman as Image: The Optical Politics of “Dames”. Film Quarterly 30.1: 2-11.

Fischer, L. (2010). City of Women: Busby Berkeley, Architecture, and Urban Space. Cinema Journal 49.4: 111-130.

Griffin, S. (2002). The Gang’s All Here: Generic versus Racial Integration in the 1940s Musical. Cinema Journal 42.1: 21-45.

Jurca, C. (2008), What the Public Wanted: Hollywood, 1937-1942. Cinema Journal 47.2: 3-25.

McLean, A. L. (2002). Feeling and the Filmed Body: Judy Garland and the Kinesics of Suffering. Film Quarterly 55.3: 2-15.

Mueller, J. (1984). Fred Astaire and the Integrated Musical. Cinema Journal 24.1: 28-40.

Neumeyer, D. (2004). Merging Genres in the 1940s: The Musical and the Dramatic Feature Film. American Music 22.1: 122-132.

 

Westerns

Buscombe, E. (2000). The Searchers. London: BFI.

Corkin, S. (2000). Cowboys and Free Markets: Post-World War II Westerns and U. S. Hegemony. Cinema Journal 39.3: 66-91

Grant, B. K. (ed.). (2003). John Ford’s Stagecoach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Hughes, H. (2008). Stagecoach to Tombstone: The Filmgoers’ Guide to the Great Westerns. London: I. B. Tauris.

Liandrat-Guigues, S. (2000). Red River. London: BFI.

Pitts, M. R. (2008). Western Film Series of the Sound Era. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Prince, S. (ed.). (1999). Sam Peckinpah’s The Wild Bunch. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rieupeyrout, J-L. (1952). The Western: A Historical Genre. The Quarterly of Film, Radio and Television. 7.2: 116-128.

Rollins, P. C. and J. E. O’Connor (eds.). (2005). Hollywood’s West: The American Frontier in Film, Television, and History. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky.

Studlar, G. and M. Bernstein (eds.). (2001). John Ford Made Westerns: Filming the Legend in the Sound Era. Bloomington, Indiana University Press.

Varner, P. (2008). Historical Dictionary of Westerns in Cinema. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

 

 

Horror Movies

See Semester 2 Selected Bibliography.

 

Combat/War Films

Birkenstein, J., A. Froula & Karen Randell (eds.). (2010). Reframing 9/11: Film, Popular Culture and the “War on Terror”. London: Continuum.

Donald, R., and K. MacDonald. (2011). Reel Men at War: Masculinity and the American War Film. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Fagelson, W. F. (2001). The Everyday Tactics of World War II Soldiers. Cinema Journal 40.3: 94-112.

Eberwein, R. (2010). The Hollywood War Film. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Hasian, M. Jr. (2001). Nostalgic Longings, Memories of the “Good War,” and Cinematic Representations in Saving Private Ryan. Critical Studies in Media Communication 18.3: 338-358.

Jones, D. B. (1945). The Hollywood War Film: 1942-1944. Hollywood Quarterly 1.1: 1-19.

Rollins, P. C., & J. F. O’Connor (eds.). (2008). Why We Fought: America’s Wars in Film and History. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky.

Rubin, S. J. (2011). Combat Films: American Realism, 1945-2010 2nd Edition. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Slocum, J. D., (2005). Cinema and the Civilizing Process: Rethinking Violence in the World War II Combat Film. Cinema Journal 44.3: 35-63.

 

Comedy

Abbott, S. & D. Jermyn (eds.). (2008). Falling in Love Again: Romantic Comedy in Contemporary Cinema. London: I. B. Tauris.

Austerlitz, S. (2010). Another Fine Mess: A History of American Film Comedy. Chicago: Chicago Review Press.

Eyman, S. (2000). Ernst Lubitsch: Laughter in Paradise. Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press.

Gardner, M. A. (2009). The Marx Brothers as Social Critics: Satire and Comic Nihilism in their Films. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Co.

Grindon, L. (2011). The Hollywood Romantic Comedy: Conventions, History, Controversies. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Horton, A. and J. E. Rapf (eds.). (2013). A Companion to Film Comedy. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

McDonald, T. J. (2007). Romantic Comedy: Boy Meets Girl Meets Genre. London: Wallflower Press.

Mortimer, C. (2010). Romantic Comedy. London: Routledge.

Neale, S. & F. Krutnik. (1990). Popular Film and Television Comedy. London: Routledge.

Paul, William. (1983). Ernst Lubitsch’s American Comedy. New York: Columbia University Press.

Shumway, D. R. (1991). Screwball Comedies: Constructing Romance, Mystifying Marriage. Cinema Journal 30.4: 7-23.

 

Melodrama

Byars, J. (1991). All That Hollywood Allows: Re-Reading Gender in 1950s Melodrama. London: Routledge.

Fischer, L. (1983). Two-Faced Women: The “Double” in Women’s Melodrama of the 1940s. Cinema Journal 23.1: 24-43.

Gledhill, C. (1986). Christine Gledhill on “Stella Dallas” and Feminist Film Theory. Cinema Journal 25.4: 44-48.

Heung, M. (1987). “What’s the Matter with Sara Jane?”: Daughters and Mothers in Douglas Sirk’s “Imitation of Life”. Cinema Journal 26.3: 21-43.

Landy, M (ed.) (1991). Imitations of Life: A Reader in Film & Television Melodrama. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.

McHugh, K. A. (1999). American Domesticity: From How-To Manual to Hollywood Melodrama. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Modleski, T. (1984). Time and Desire in the Woman’s Film. Cinema Journal 23.3: 19-30.

Skvirsky, S. A. (2008). The Price of Heaven: Remaking Politics in All That Heaven Allows, Ali: Fear Eats the Soul, and Far From Heaven. Cinema Journal 47.3: 90-121.

Williams, L. (1984). “Something Else besides a Mother”: “Stella Dallas” and the Maternal Melodrama. Cinema Journal 24.1: 2-27.

Williams, L. (1991). Film Bodies: Gender, Genre, and Excess. Film Quarterly 44.4: 2-13.

 

Teen-Pics

Bleach, A. C. (2010). Postfeminist Cliques? Class, Postfeminism, and the Molly Ringwald-John Hughes Films. Cinema Journal 49.3: 24-44.

Doherty, T. (2002). Teenagers and Teenpics: The Juvenilization of American Movies of the 1950s. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Driscoll, C. (2011). Teen Film: A Critical Introduction. Oxford: Berg

Gilbert, J. (1986). A Cycle of Outrage: America’s Reaction to the Juvenile Delinquent in the 1950s. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

McCoy, B. (1998). Manager, Buddy, Delinquent: “Blackboard Jungle’s” Desegregating Triangle. Cinema Journal 38.1: 25-39

Shary, T. (2002). Generation Multiplex: The Image of Youth in Contemporary American Cinema. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.

Slocum, J. D. (ed.) (2005). Rebel Without a Cause: Approaches to a Maverick Masterwork. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

 

Gangster/Crime Film

Berliner, T. (2001). The Genre Film as Booby Trap: 1970s Genre Bending and “The French Connection”. Cinema Journal 40.3: 25-46.

Castillo, R. (2006). Gangster Priest: The Italian American Cinema of Martin Scorsese. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Hughes, H. (2006). Crime Wave: The Filmgoer’s Guide to the Great Crime Movies. London: I. B. Tauris.

Leitch, T. (2004). Crime Films. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Rafter, N. (2000). Shots in the Mirror: Crime Films & Society. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rafter, N. and M. Brown. (2011). Criminology Goes to the Movies: Crime Theory and Popular Culture. New York: New York University Press.

Rubin, M. (1999). Thrillers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Shadoian, J. (2003). Dreams & Dead Ends: The American Gangster Film, 2nd Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.  

 

Film Noir

Abbott, M. E. (2002). The Street Was Mine: White Masculinity in Hardboiled Fiction and Film Noir. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Broe, D. (2009). Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood. University Press of Florida.

Clute, S. S. and R. L. Edwards. (2011). The Maltese Touch of Evil: Film Noir and Potential Criticism. Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England.

Dixon, W. W. (2007). Film Noir and the Cinema of Paranoia. Edinburgh: University of Edinburgh Press.

Flory, D. (2008). Philosophy, Black Film, Film Noir. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press.

Krutnik, F. (1991). In a Lonely Street: Film noir, genre, masculinity. London: Routledge.

Lyons, A. (2000). Death on the Cheap: the Lost B Movies of Film Noir. Da Capo Press.

Naremore, J. (1995-1996). American Film Noir: The History of an Idea. Film Quarterly  49.2: 12-28.

Phillips, G. D. (2000). Creatures of Darkness: Raymond Chandler, Detective Fiction and Film Noir. Lexington, KY: University Press of Kentucky.

Schwartz, R. (2014). Houses of Noir: Dark Visions from Thirteen Film Studios. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Spicer, A. (2010). Historical Dictionary of Film Noir. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Vighi, F. (2012). Critical Theory and Film: Rethinking Ideology through Film Noir. London: Continuum.

Wager, J. B. (2005). Dames in the Driver’s Seat: Rereading Film Noir. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.

 

Horror (Semester 2)

Abbott, S. (2007). Celluloid Vampires: Life after Death in the Modern World. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.

Allmer, P., E. Brick, & D. Huxley (eds.). (2012). European Nightmares: Horror Cinema in Europe since 1945. London: Wallflower Press.

Benshoff, H. M. (ed.). (2014). A Companion to the Horror Film. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.

Blake, L. (2008). The Wounds of Nations: Horror Cinema, Historical Trauma and National Identity. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Boss, P. (1986). Vile bodies and Bad Medicine. Screen 27.1: 14-25,

Briefel, A. (2005). Monster Pains: Masochism, Menstruation and Identification in the Horror Film. Film Quarterly 58.5: 16-27.

Briefel, A. and S. J. Miller (eds.). (2011). Horror After 9/11: World of Fear, Cinema of Terror. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.

Britton, A., R. Lippe, T. Williams, and R. Wood. (1979). American Nightmare: Essays on the Horror Film. Toronto: Festival of Festivals.

Brophy, P. (1986). Horrality – The Textuality of Contemporary Horror Films. Screen 27.1: 2-13.

Browning, J. E. and C. J. Picart (eds.). (2009). Draculas, Vampires, and Other Undead Forms. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Carroll, N. (1990). The Philosophy of Horror, or Paradoxes of the Heart. London: Routledge.

Cherry, B. (2009). Horror. London: Routledge.

Chibnall, S. & J. Petley. (2002). British Horror Cinema. London: Routledge.

Choi, J and M. Wada-Marciano (eds.) (2009). Horror to the Extreme: Changing Boundaries in Asian Cinema. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Cohen, J. J. (ed.). (1996). Monster Theory. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Conrich, I. (ed.). (2010). Horror Zone: The Cultural Experience of Contemporary Horror Cinema. London: I. B. Tauris.

Crane, J. L. (1994). Terror and Everyday Life: Singular Moments in the History of the Horror Film. London: Sage.

Curry, C. W. (2008). Film Alchemy: The Independent Cinema of Ted V. Mikels. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Derry, C. (2009). Dark Dreams 2.0: A Psychological History of the Modern Horror Film from the 1950s to the 21st Century. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Eyles, A., R. Adkinson, and N. Fry (eds.) (1994). House of Horror: The Complete Hammer Films Story. London: Creation Books.

Fahy, T. (ed.). (2010). The Philosophy of Horror. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Freeland, C. A. (2000). The Naked and the Undead: Evil and the Appeal of Horor. Oxford: Westview Press.

Fore, D. (2009). “Oh yes. There will be blood”: Sacrificial Power and Disability in Saw and Saw 2. Golem: Journal of Religion and Monsters 3.1: 27-36.

Gelder, K. (ed.). (2000). The Horror Reader.London: Routledge.

Hantke, S. (ed.). (2010). American Horror Film: The Genre at the Turn of the Millennium. Jackson, MI: University Press of Mississippi.

Harrington, C. (1952). Ghoulies and Ghosties. Quarterly of Film Radio and Television. 7.2: 191-202.

Hawkins, J. (2000). Cutting Edge: Art-Horror and the Horrific Avant-garde. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Heffernan, K. (2004). Ghouls, Gimmicks, and Gold: Horror Films and the American Movie Business, 1953-1968. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Heller-Nicholas, A. (2014). Found Footage Horror Films: Fear and the Appearance of Reality. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Hill, S. and S. Smith (eds.). (2009). There Be Dragons Out There: Confronting Fear, Horror and Terror. Oxford: Inter-Disciplinary Press.

Hutchings, P. (2009). The A to Z of Horror Cinema. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Kawin, B. (2012). Horror and the Horror Film. London: Anthem Press.

Jancovich, M. (ed.). (2002). Horror, The Film Reader. London: Routledge.

Koven, M. J. (2006). La Dolce Morte: Vernacular Cinema and the Italian Giallo Film. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Koven, M. J. (2008). Film, Folklore and Urban Legends. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Koven, M. J. (2014). The Giallo and the Spaghetti Nightmare Film. In P. Bondandella (ed.) The Italian Cinema Book. London: BFI.

Koven, M. J. (2015). Tradition and the International Zombie Film: The Movies. In J. Thomas (ed.) Putting the Supernatural in its Place: Folklore, the Hypermodern and the Ethereal. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press: 90-125.

Lázaro-Reboll, A. (2012). Spanish Horror Film. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Lobato, R. and M. D. Ryan. (2011) Rethinking Genre Studies Through Distribution Analysis: Issues in International Horror Movie Circuits. New Review of Film and Television Studies 9.2: 188-203.

Lowenstein, A. (2005). Shocking Representation: Historical Trauma, National Cinema and the Modern Horror Film. New York: Columbia University Press.

McRoy, J. (2006). Nightmare Japan: Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema. Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Meikle, D. (2009). A History of Horrors: The Rise and Fall of the House of Hammer Revised Edition. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.

Mendik, X (ed.) (2002). Shocking Cinema of the Seventies. London: Noir Publishing.

Morgan, J. (2002). The Biology of Horror: Gothic Literature and Film. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.

Nowell, R. (2011). Blood Money: A History of the First Teen Slasher Film Cycle. London: Continuum.

Paszylk, B. (2009). The Pleasure and Pain of Cult Horror Films: An Historical Survey. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.

Phillips, K. R. (2012). Dark Directions: Romero, Craven, Carpenter and the Modern Horror Film. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.

Prince, S. (ed.). (2004). The Horror Film. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Russo, J. (1985). The Complete Night of the Living Dead Filmbook. Imagine, Inc.

Schneider, S. J. (ed.). (2003). Fear without Frontiers: Horror Cinema Across the Globe. Godalming: FAB Press.

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